St. Joseph the Worker Church



The surprisingly deep spiritual meaning behind "Ordinary Time"

- Philip Kosloski

The term appears to be generic, but actually highlights its spiritual focus.

After Pentecost the Church resumes what is now called the season of "Ordinary Time." But what does that really mean? Is it some sort of generic season in the Church that has no focus? 0

On the contrary, Ordinary Time has a specific focus even though the English name for it can be confusing. In Latin this period of time is called "Tempus Per Annum," more literally translated as "time during the year." The English translators chose to present it as "Ordinary Time," which has at its root the Latin word "ordo," or in English "order." In one sense this season takes its name from the ordinal numbers by which the Sundays are known (Second, Third, Fourth, etc. Sunday in Ordinary Time).

In a deeper sense, though, Ordinary Time can be seen as a "time of order" in the Church's year. What "order" does it have? The USCCB explains: Christmas Time and Easter Time highlight the central mysteries of the Paschal Mystery, namely, the incarnation, death on the cross, resurrection, and ascension of Jesus Christ, and the descent of the Holy Spirit at Pentecost. The Sundays and weeks of Ordinary Time, on the other hand, take us through the life of Christ. This is the time of conversion. This is living the life of Christ. Ordinary Time is a time for growth and maturation, a time in which the mystery of Christ is called to penetrate ever more deeply into history until all things are finally caught up in Christ. The goal, toward which all of history is directed, is represented by the final Sunday in Ordinary Time, the Solemnity of Our Lord Jesus Christ, King of the Universe.

Ordinary Time is a specific season in the Church that focuses on the life of Christ during his three years of public ministry. That is why the start of Ordinary Time begins with the Baptism of the Lord, as that is the beginning of Jesus' public ministry. The Second Sunday of Ordinary Time follows suit, focusing on the Wedding Feast at Cana, also known as Jesus' first public miracle.

The color for this liturgical season is green, which is most associated with growth. Ordinary Time is then viewed as a time of growing in our knowledge and love of Jesus. It is a time "ordered" to spiritual growth, walking in the footsteps of Jesus's public life. So while the season's name may appear to be an afterthought, it is not without meaning.



3 Powerful sacramentals to have in your home

- Philip Koslosk

The use of sacramentals is one of the most misunderstood practices in the Catholic Church. They have been part of the Church's life from the very beginning, but are commonly viewed as some sort of superstition.

This is largely due to the fact that many Catholics over the centuries have used sacramentals in a superstitious way as they were not taught how to use them properly. Instead of using them with faith, some Catholics used them as magic charms rather than instruments of grace.

This is unfortunate, as sacramentals are meant to enrich our spiritual lives, not hinder them. They have been instituted by the Church to draw us into a deeper relationship with Christ and are focused on sanctifying every part of our lives. Sacramentals are extensions of the seven sacraments and bring the grace of God into everything that we do.

One place where sacramentals are especially powerful is in the home. If used in a spirit of faith, sacramentals can protect us from spiritual harm or inspire us to live a holy life dedicated to God.

Here are three such sacramentals that, if used properly, can provide a spiritual boost to the home as well as keep away spiritual enemies that are lurking in the shadows.

Holy water

Holy water has a double meaning of reminding us of our baptism as well as a symbol of spiritual cleansing. Holy water is said to have great power over the devil as the devil cannot stand this "clean" water, since he is entirely unclean for all eternity. It is a reminder of the water that flowed out of Christ's side, which is a symbol of Baptism, and brings to mind the day of the devil's defeat (Christ's crucifixion). It is an ancient custom to have what are called "holy water stoups" or "holy water fonts" on the walls of a home. They are elaborate or simple cups that hold holy water, which can then be used to bless oneself throughout the day. It is especially helpful to have them at the doors that lead outside the house as well as in the bedrooms of family members. That way we keep ourselves always fixed on Christ and remind ourselves to remain pure. It also keeps the holy water handy when needed to ward off any influence of the Evil One.

Blessed salt

If possible, it is also good to have a small container of blessed salt in your home. You would have to specifically ask your parish priest to provide that for you and odds are likely that your parish priest would not be familiar with it. This is one sacramental that is often neglected and is not typically used in parishes. However, it is a powerful weapon against evil as can be seen by the following portion of the blessing said by the priest found in the Roman Ritual. Almighty and everlasting God, we humbly implore you, in your immeasurable kindness and love, to bless (+) this salt which you created and gave to the use of mankind, so that it may become a source of health for the minds and bodies of all who make use of it. May it rid whatever it touches or sprinkles of all uncleanness, and protect it from every assault of evil spirits. Through Christ our Lord.

Crucifix

Another very powerful sacramental that is more typically found in our homes is the crucifix. Not only does a crucifix remind us of the great love that God had for us, but it also is a strong deterrent to spiritual enemies. The crucifix is the bane of Satan's existence and is the sign of everything that he despises. It is beneficial to have a crucifix in every room in your house (or apartment) so that you can frequently meditate on Jesus' great sacrifice of love as well as have an image to remind you what you need to focus on during times of temptation.

Here are two prayers of blessing a crucifix in the Roman Ritual which sum up all the reasons we need them in our homes.

Holy Lord, almighty Father, everlasting God, be pleased to bless + this cross, that it may be a saving help to mankind. Let it be the support of faith, an encouragement to good works, the redemption of souls; and let it be consolation, protection, and a shield against the cruel darts of the enemy; through Christ our Lord.

Lord Jesus Christ, bless + this cross by which you snatched the world from Satan's grasp, and on which you overcame by your suffering the tempter to sin, who rejoiced in the first man's fall in eating of the forbidden tree. Here it is sprinkled with holy water. May this cross be hallowed in the name of the Father, + and of the Son, + and of the Holy + Spirit; and may all who kneel and pray before this cross in honor of our Lord find health in body and soul; through Christ our Lord.



Prayer to Saint Joseph, our Patron, for a Difficult Problem

O Glorious St. Joseph, thou who hast power to render possible even things which are considered impossible, come to our aid in our present trouble and distress.

Take this important and difficult affair under thy particular protection, that it may end happily.

(MENTION YOUR REQUEST)

O dear St. Joseph, all our confidence is in thee. Let it not be said that we would invoke thee in vain; and since thou art so powerful with Jesus and Mary, show that thy goodness equal thy power. Amen.

St. Joseph, friend of the Sacred Heart, pray for us.