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Reflection
November 27, 2014

Reflection on Pope Francis' Evangelization Intention for the month of November

Word On Fire


  • November 23, 2014 HE REIGNS! THE SOLEMNITY OF CHRIST THE KING
    When Israel begins to long for a new David, the true David and true king of the world, we witness the longing for God. Jesus Christ is precisely this king: the Davidic king, and God ruling his creation. His ministry reveals the nature of his kingship, from the manger to the cross.

  • November 16, 2014 PARABLE OF THE TALENTS : 33rd Week in Ordinary Time
    Your being increases in the measure that you give it away. That's the law of the gift, and it can be found from end to end of the Bible. One application of this law has to do with faith itself. Your faith will grow only in the measure that you give it away, sharing it with others.



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Prayer to St. Joseph for Employment

Dear Saint Joseph, you were yourself once faced with the responsibility of providing the necessities of life for Jesus and Mary. Look down with fatherly compassion upon me in my anxiety over my present inability to support my family. Please help me to find gainful employment very soon, so that this heavy burden of concern will be lifted from my heart and that I am soon able to provide for those whom God has entrusted to my care. Help us to guard against bitterness and discouragement, so that we may emerge from this trial spiritually enriched and with even greater blessings from God. Amen.


Respect Life
Events & News


Mission Statement

St. Joseph the Worker Parish is a diverse Catholic Community, which welcomes people from many different places in their faith journey and serves the Gospel of Jesus Christ through worship, education, social justice, service to the poor and engagement in community concerns.

Nuestra Misión

La Iglesia de San José Oberero es una comunidad católica diversa, que le da la bienvenida a gente de diferentes lugares en su jornada de fe y que propone cumplir con la Buena Nueva de Cristo Jesús a través de la liturgia, la educación, la justicia social, en el servicio a los pobres y entregados a las necesidades de la communidad.


Announcements from the desk of Father Kenneth


Thanksgiving Eve and Day Schedule Change

Since many will be traveling out of town or preparing at home for Thanksgiving Day meals and other family festivities, we will not be offering our Wednesday Night Candle Light Mass, Adoration and Confession service this coming Wednesday. We will resume once again on the following Wednesday, December 3rd.

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Our Thanksgiving Day Mass will be offered at 9:30am in the Church. Please join us in giving thanks to God for the many blessings He has bestowed on us throughout this year - a spirit of humble Gratitude is pleasing to our Lord. You are also invited to bring a basket filled with your Thanksgiving Day wine, bread and other meal goodies to be blessed at our Thanksgiving Day Mass. Baskets may be placed in front of the Altar before the start of our Mass at 9:30am. Please note: there will not be a 7:30am chapel Mass on Thanksgiving Day.


TREASURES FROM OUR TRADITION

Coming to the end of the Church year, we can wonder how we got "extreme unction" out of "anointing of the sick." "Extreme" comes from a Latin phrase, in extremis, which in English refers to the last struggle of a dying person. "Last rites" is a phrase in common usage, and refers to the fact that years ago everyone waited until the last crisis of illness to summon the priest. The goal of anointing had always been healing and forgiveness, but in time it began to be seen as a preparation for death. In a hard world, almost anything from a hangnail to a sneeze could be life-threatening, so perhaps the change was inevitable. The emphasis on the penitential aspects was heightened, even to the odd practice of Rome in the twelfth century, when the sick person was sprinkled with ashes mixed with holy water and given a hair shirt as a sign of penance.

The reformers thankfully overlooked some of these oddities of history, and today the sacrament of the sick is much more generously applied to persons in a wide range of situations. Still, it is a sacrament of reconciliation, and for that reason is not celebrated for an infant or toddler, although there is a rite for a visit to a sick child not including anointing or Communion.

- Rev. James Field, Copyright © J. S. Paluch Co.


Living 'Gospel poverty'

Pass It On — by Catherine Doherty

"How I would like a Church which is poor and for the poor!"
— Pope Francis, Press Conference, March 16, 2013

"If you want a rich Church, then it has no life."
— Pope Francis, Homily at Mass, 11 June 2013

We are being led by the Holy Spirit to examine our souls in regard to showing the face of poverty to the world—we who are followers of the Divine Pauper who had nowhere to lay his head. We are followers of Christ, the Carpenter who was poor, but not destitute—however, he died naked on a cross, for love of us.

The poverty of the Gospel burns like a fire in my soul. It seems to me that evangelical poverty is often discussed on a superficial level. As Christians, we haven't dug deep enough into what poverty is all about. The Gospel requires sacrifice and renunciation. Living in a simple way might seem idiocy, but it will conquer. The essential principle is to be found in detachment in regard to all possessions. The strange thing is that when you think you are totally detached, you discover an abyss of attachments! How easily we are fooled. We will never know what Gospel poverty really is until we stop being avaricious, gluttonous, and preoccupied with ourselves.

The Gospel says that if someone asks you for your cloak, give him your tunic, too (Luke 6:29). It is I who must feed the hungry, clothe the naked, visit the sick. We are filled with guilt because the very means of communication we have invented are opening our eyes to the tragic mess that we have made of the world. We cannot sleep as peacefully as we did before, because the poverty of our brethren is brought into our living room on a screen, vividly and realistically. The inhuman life of many people today is a degrading sight; their condition defies description. Yet even the most degraded person is still a child of God and has his Spirit.

Gospel poverty is a way of life, our Christian calling. It is the fruit of the love of God, and is the key to humility, which is truth. And since truth is God, poverty is a shortcut to God. We need to acknowledge our own intense personal poverty and realize that all we are, all we have, is from God. Once you accept your own poverty before God you will become humble. You will walk in and with God. The acceptance of this truth will make you free, free to love and to serve, even in tragic circumstances. It will also make you free to love and serve God more passionately and constantly.

Gospel poverty moves into a totality of surrender of oneself, for no amount of giving pennies or dollars or millions of same can take the place of that inner, deep, complete surrender. It is essential that our lives be a continual inner stripping of self. We may be called to let ourselves be stripped by others. This involves relinquishing our own wills and doing that of another. In this way, we can identify with the poor of the world and with Christ who was stripped for our sake. This will lead to our resurrection in him.

I think much of Christ's hidden life before he began his public life. There is hidden deeply within it a pattern for our lives. One aspect especially holds my attention: his identification with the poor. Within that word "identification", I sense a whole way of life. One thing I know: Christ did not "help" the poor by what today we might call ‘works of charity'. He helped by being poor. He did not take upon himself holy poverty: he waspoor, without 'taking it on'.

In our world, which worships wealth, power, comfort, how is the Church going to teach the luminous Gospel of Christ—which is filled with detachment, with poverty of spirit, as well as factual poverty? The only way she can do it is to become visibly poor herself, in all men and women—be they popes, cardinals, bishops, priests or lay people. Then and only then will she be able to bring the glad news of the Gospel to the world, when she clothes her life in the Glad News that she preaches.

Adapted from the writings of Catherine Doherty.
Pass It On
by Madonna House Publications.

Catherine Doherty (1896-1985), born in Russia, was foundress of Madonna House and a prolific writer and teacher. Her passionate zeal impelled her to pass on her faith in God, and she is now being considered for sainthood by the Catholic Church.

Copyright: Madonna House Publications – With Permission under a Creative Commons License.